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Which tie knot will make me stand out from the crowd?

Benno Büchler, 29.03.2023

Dat titelbild zum zweiten Teil der Expertenkrawattenblogs

It continues!

You haven't had enough with the last few expert-level tie knots, and you want more.

Then you're in luck, because I still have some to present and with those I also had to invest some time until I could.

What knot do I need to wear to stand out from the crowd?

You will certainly stand out from the crowd when you adorn yourself with one of these two knots: the Merovingian and the Eldredge knot. While the Eldredge stands out mainly due to its size and the many loops, the Merovingian impresses by looking nearly impossible.

Of course, you can also watch the corresponding videos for the instructions on YouTube, or directly here on the blog.

Onassis knot

der Onassis Knoten ist ein Krawattenknoten ohne sichtbaren Knoten
Source: Own photo

"Tie a tie knot without a knot."

"huh?!"

"exactly!"

This is the Onassis Knot. It is named after Aristotle Onassis, who did not invent it, but made it famous through his own style.

At first glance it looks like a scarf, because the essential part is hidden behind the tie itself.

  1. Start with the wide end on your right side.
  2. Take the wide end and pass it over the narrow end.
  3. Feed the wide end around the narrow end from the back to the right.
  4. Place the wide end over the narrow end to the left.
  5. Pull the wide end under the neck loop.
  6. Feed the wide end down through the loop formed in step 5
  7. Carefully pull the wide end through.
  8. Tighten the knot, making sure there's enough space between your neck and the knot. (Attentive readers may have noticed that up until now, we've simply been making a Four-in-Hand knot.)
  9. Pass the wide end behind the knot, from the bottom up.
  10. Place the wide end down over the knot and adjust the details slightly.

The width of the collar in the Onassis knot depends on the width of the tie. The tie should lie flat over the knot and not be pinched by the collar. At the same time, for example, a shark collar presents too much of the knot, which we have hidden below.

In my experience, a button-down collar looks very good, as long as the tie you choose is not too wide.



Eldredge knot

Eldredge Knoten, gross und Voluminös
Source: Own photo

Want the wow effect from the Fishbone knot, but realized you don't have a tie long enough?

Here comes the Eldredge knot.

It looks a bit simpler than the Fishbone, isn't as overly wide, and still makes for big eyes at events.

  1. We start with the wide end on the left side and the tip about at the level of the navel.
  2. Guide the narrow end over the wide and directly around the back.
  3. Pull it from the outside through the neck loop to the left.
  4. Put it over the knot in the front.
  5. Now pull it from behind through the neck loop to the left.
  6. Pass it again behind the knot and pull the end through the freshly created loop to the upper left.
  7. Dive from the top through the neck loop and bring the end directly back from the top to the neck loop on the right.
  8. Pull the end down through the freshly created loop and then left through the neck loop.
  9. Hide the leftover either in your shirt or in your collar.

The Eldgredge knot offers a complex and, most importantly, less obtrusive version of the Fishbone and looks great with a rather wider collar.



Krasny hourglass

Die Sanduhr, erfunden von Alex Krasny
Source: Own photo

Here the name says it all!

The Hourglass Knot, invented by Alex Krasny, looks just like an hourglass. It is formed from the classic Four-in-Hand knot and the additional hourglass feature.

Of course, if you're in a hurry, you can just finish tying the tie at point eight.

  1. Start with the wide end on your right side.
  2. Take the wide end and pass it over the narrow end.
  3. Feed the wide end around the narrow end from the back to the right.
  4. Place the wide end over the narrow end to the left.
  5. Pull the wide end under the neck loop.
  6. Feed the wide end down through the loop formed in step 5
  7. Carefully pull the wide end through.
  8. Tighten the knot all the way. (The attentive readers will have noticed that up to now we have simply done a four-in-hand).
  9. Now take the narrow end that is hidden behind the wide one and run it around the wide one, from right to left.
  10. From the narrow end, the outer side should also be outside and this part must be as close as possible to the four-in-hand knot.
  11. Pass the narrow end behind the wide (not through the neck loop!) and pull it through the resulting loop on the right. (you practically pull it through itself)
  12. Pull the narrow end down and adjust it so that the two halves form as nice an hourglass as possible.

Hourglass looks much more complicated than it actually is. It's a small addition to a normal tie knot that gives it a subtle elegance and definitely attracts more attention.

Since it is still essentially a four-in-hand, it looks great with a button-down, or a narrow collar.



Merovingian knot

Merovingian inspired by the Matrix trilogy
Source: Own photo

Fans of the Matrix trilogy take note!

Now it's about the Merovingian, also known as the French . The program that was exiled when it became too powerful.

More precisely, it's about the tie knot of Merowinger.

This elaborate knot, with the many twists is more intended for men with a shorter torso (or you combine it with a vest to hide the lack of length )

  1. Pass the wide end to the left, under the narrow end
  2. Feed the wide end up through the neck loop.
  3. Drag it to the bottom left.
  4. Place the wide end in front of the narrow end to the right.
  5. Feed it up through the neck loop.
  6. Drag it over the node to the bottom right.
  7. Pass it behind the knot to the left
  8. Insert the wide end into the neck loop from the left side.
  9. Lift the narrow end upward.
  10. Pull the wide end through the ribbon and up, while the narrow end rests on your shoulder.
  11. Pull it through until it is firm.
  12. Guide it down to finish the knot and set it.

That the Merovingian stands out visually from the classic knots is clear. However, how complex the knot itself is also surprised me.

I recommend a wide collar to give the knot the space it deserves. With a narrow collar you have the possibility to hide the two horns, of which the underside is visible.

With this knot, you're sure to have a good detail for the next 90s (strictly speaking, 2000s) party always at hand.



Linwood Taurus

der Linwood Taurus sieht ein bisschen aus wie die Hörner von einem Stier
Source: Own photo

The aggressive Linwood Taurus. Invented by Linwood Darkis, it looks like a bull with horns.

This knot needs time to perfect.

If you need it fast, try the Onassis, or a Trinity node.

  1. Start with the wide end on your right side. It should be significantly longer than the narrow end.
  2. Cross the wide end over the narrow end to the left.
  3. Guide the wide end up through the neck loop.
  4. Pull it down to the right and behind the knot to the left. The resulting loop on the right should not be too tight.
  5. Guide it into the neck loop from the front. This loop must also not be too strict.
  6. Pull it out to the bottom left.
  7. Feed the wide end through the two front loops from steps 4 and 5. From left to right.
  8. Bring the wide end behind the knot.
  9. Pull it into the neck loop from below.
  10. Guide the wide end down through the loop formed in step 8. Tighten it well so that the two loops on the left and right stand up like bullhorns.
  11. This knot requires extra work to work out the various folds and curves. Be sure to do it in front of a mirror and allow enough time to do it once or twice.

Find the right tie here is not easy.

In my experience, a narrow and relatively stiff tie works best. I recommend you to practice this knot with different ones, then you will notice which one works best.

As for the collar, I would opt for the widest possible, because this knot really needs its space. Whereas you can hide any blemishes on the knot with a narrower collar.



Diagonal knot

The diagonal knot is much heavier than it looks
Source: Own photo

It looks very simple.

There aren't that many steps, either.

But the Diagonal Knot has the potential to be the most difficult knot I've presented so far.

  1. Start with the wide end on the right side.
  2. Cross the narrow end with the wide end to the left.
  3. Lead it around behind the narrow end to the right.
  4. Feed it again through the front to the left. Leave a little space so that a loop is created.
  5. And at the back around the knot to the right.
  6. Feed it up through the neck loop.
  7. Pull it through to the left.
  8. Carefully pull the wide end through the loop formed in step 4.
  9. Carefully tighten and adjust.

For the last two steps you need some patience and probably several attempts to make sure that the wide end is in the front at the end and not next to the narrow one.

This knot makes the best shape with a narrow collar and tie.

Conclusion

These were definitely the hardest knots I've done so far. Especially the last two are really tough.

If you haven't had enough with these 6 knots, here are some more that are extremely challenging and here I have collected all the blogs about ties.

Have fun tying these expert level knots and let me know in the comments if there are any knots I haven't worked on yet.

Quelle Titelbild: Pixabay | überarbeiteter Beitrag



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